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Southern Nevada Water Authority

Drought Restrictions and Water Conservation

The "bath tub ring" at Lake Mead

Water restrictions have been adopted by
local city and county governments to help
curb water use.

As a community, we've been dealing with drought conditions for more than a decade. Together, residents and business owners have removed thousands of acres of turf, planted desert landscaping and curbed water waste.

Drought restrictions were adopted in 2003 to help Southern Nevada conserve water. Conservation efforts in the Las Vegas Valley have helped reduce the community’s Colorado River consumption by 30 billion gallons between 2002 and 2016, even as the population increased by more than 600,000 residents during that time.

In 2016, Southern Nevada used 123 gallons per capita per day, representing a 38 percent decline the community’s per capita water use since 2002. (Note: This number reflects water from all sources used by residents and businesses served by municipal water providers, as well as recovered indoor water treated and returned to the Colorado River system and water used by 40 million annual visitors. Because different water agencies' calculation methodologies vary, comparing cities' water efficiency through the use of this metric is not recommended.)

SNWA Permanent Water Restrictions

Turf Limitations

Municipality Conservation Codes

Municipality conservation codes contain more details about water conservation measures and are available at Municode.com. The chapter or title number for each municipality is listed below. The municipality conservation codes for Boulder City are available on SterlingCodifiers.com using the link below.

Multimedia


Video: Drought Update

An aerial view of the Colorado river

Get the latest news about the drought in Southern Nevada and along the Colorado River. Play

Report Water Waste


Water from a sprinkler runs down a sidewalk

Help protect our water supply by reporting water waste.

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